Core Values for Teams

Teamwork makes the dream work. Nothing makes work more enjoyable than doing what you love with a group of people you like. But sometimes getting into a good rhythm can be a challenge. Whether you’re incorporating someone new to a team or building a cracker-jack lineup from scratch, figuring out team dynamics takes time and effort.

People often underestimate the importance of diving into each individual’s values when trying to succeed on a team. Knowing your team’s culture can greatly help you understand teamwork.

Here are a few statistics that may reassure you that company culture is important. As we define it, culture is simply the way we’ve agree to work with one another. It might seem simple, but it encompasses all aspects of working on a team.

It encompasses daily activitiThe most effective way to get a team to work well together quickly is to get a glimpse of each team member’s values. This is crucial to understanding the team’s culture, which is in many ways the cornerstone of teamwork.

es, expectations, communication and work. And understanding the rules we’ve created for ourselves creates the sense of unity, cohesion, and meaning employees get at work.

Understanding not just your own personal values, but the values of both individual teammates and the group at large is an integral part of being successful at work. And it’s also a key aspect of your culture. When you understand what someone else’s values are, you can work with them in a way that helps you get the best out of them and visa-versa. By refocusing on what your collective values are, you can create a fun, functional team that works seamlessly.

 

Use Values as a Guide

Entrepreneurs tend to conflate team building and building a business. Their goal when building a business is to boost their revenues. After all, it takes time, energy, and money to find the right kind of people.

Yes and no. While finding the right people can be time consuming, correcting an error when you hire the wrong one can be just as bad if not worse.

Finding talent for your company begins with examining your core values and working backwards from there.

We started by defining core values, which are a set of beliefs that determine how we act and think. Our core values are different from one another and interact in different ways. ways depending on their level of importance. These are the core values identified by the Schwartz Theory:

  1. Self-Direction: correlates with independence, creativity and exploration.
  2. Stimulation: craving the new. Ties into excitement, novelty and challenges.
  3. Hedonism: things that correlate to pleasure or gratification for oneself.
  4. Achievement: success through showing your competence.
  5. Power: tied to social status, prestige and control.
  6. Security: relates to ideas of safety, harmony and stability.
  7. Conformity: restraining oneself and complying with societal norms.
  8. Tradition: breeds goals around respect, commitment and older ideas.
  9. Benevolence: making sure you take care for or are concerned for the welfare of those you know.
  10. Universalism: a deep desire to understand, protect and promote the welfare of all.

Most people have a mix of the above core values financial future and are happiest when their values align with what they do daily. Which means when it comes to building out a team, you need to make sure you’re filling it with people whose values line up with their job and the group.

Arranging team and individual values requires having a vision for what you want your team’s core values to be. For instance, let’s say you’re a creative wanting to build out a marketing and content team for a cutting-edge new tech company. You’re hoping to fill out fifteen spots – that’s a lot of people – and you don’t have the time to individually manage everyone every day. Furthermore, what you do requires a quick turnaround.

Based on your needs, you probably don’t want to put together a team whose values center around conformity or tradition – especially if those values don’t align with what you do. Instead, create a team of individuals who are self-directed and stimulation driven. The type of people who enjoy diving in, figuring things out and tackling new things.

By understanding exactly what values your team needs to have, you can figure out what individual jobs need to require, and who best would meet those needs. That way, when you hire those people, you’ll go into it with an understanding of what values you want that person to embody.

 

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